Moisture Content of Wood When Applying Defy Stains

by Defy Help

2019 Update on Moisture Content of Wood for Defy Stains

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Moisture Content of Wood When Applying Defy Wood and Deck Stains.

When applying defy deck stain it’s important to note the moisture content of the wood. If the wood you are staining is too moist it can create mold and mildew problems. If you apply stain to moist wood it can trap and seal the moisture in, which can also create rot and decay problems. To prevent this it’s important to check the moisture content of the wood whether it’s after a rainstorm or after you have washed the wood that you’re getting ready to stain.

To check the moisture content of wood when applying Defy deck stain you will need a moisture meter. Once you have a moisture meter you can stick the prongs into the wood so that you can get a moisture content reading. For the best results take several readings to get an average. Take a reading on some sections of the wood that get plenty of sun exposure and also on the more shaded areas of the wood. It is these more shady areas that tend to be moist for longer periods of time.

Ideally, you want a moisture content reading of 12% to 15% or less before you apply the Defy deck stain. If you find areas that are much higher than this do not apply stain until they have dried out. Without a moisture meter, you will just have to wait 2 to 3 days on average after cleaning the wood for it to dry. The drying time can vary depending on wood type, age, and porosity. Exterior wood that gets a lot of sun exposure will try out much faster than wood that is mostly shaded. Weather and climate also have a lot to do with it.

Once you are confident that the wood has a 12% to 15% moisture content reading or less then you are free to begin applying Defy deck stain. It’s better to let the deck sit and dry out for several days or even a week or so if you are not sure that it’s ready to be stained. This will ensure you are not trapping unwanted moisture in the wood that may cause problems down the road.

 
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MLV
MLV

What should moisture meter reading be – the article says to use a moisture meter, but fails to identify what is acceptable range

RJ
RJ

On pressure treated wood in Virginia that has been weathered for 7 months (or I can wait til spring and it will be over 12 months) should i wait until Spring and risk damage from winter? And from reading and watching videos it is hard to determine if either 1 coat or 2 coats wet on wet is better?

DefyHelp
DefyHelp

Best to wait until Spring. Prep first and apply two light coats wet on wet.